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Found 4 results

  1. Description: See ABRP 3.7 provides NaN's for clock times along a calculated route on a 2017 Tesla MX (AP 2.0) running 2019.16.3.2. I verified that the Tesla browser is getting vehicle system time correctly using the website shown in the picture. I now suspect there's a bug in ABRP 3.7 if it runs in the AP 2.0 web browser. I've attached an image of the trip summary table from the Tesla showing the NaN's. Link to Plan: If the bug is in finding a route, please copy the plan link here (found under "Share"). Replication Steps: Open the Web Browser on a Tesla running AP 2.0 hardware and firmware 2019.16.3.2 (mine is a 2017 MX built March 2017) (2019.16.3.2 is essentially the latest firmware release). Using ABRP 3.7 in the browser, plan a trip from the current location to some location a few hours away. Review trip summary table for NaN values in the arrival and departure time columns. Remember, the more detail you can provide in your bug report, the faster we can fix it!
  2. I've tried running the latest version of ABRP (3.7) in the browser on my AP 2.0 car. It seems to run OK, perhaps a bit slow. I have two questions: 1) In a YouTube video from Now You Know done in a Model 3, ABRP popped up a login prompt right after starting up in the browser, and the login feature apparently ties the website to vehicle data & data transfer. I don't see that login prompt in my vehicle. Is that because I'm using an older browser (AP 2.0)? 2) The YouTube video also showed a bunch of customization possible in ABRP running in the vehicle after the login prompt. I don't see any of them in ABRP running in my vehicle. Am I missing some tab/feature that reveals this? 2) I see NaN's in the time of arrival columns for a trip planned in my vehicle. It does show the trip duration time. I don't see the NaN's when planning the same trip on a desktop computer running Firefox & ABRP. Why are the NaN's appearing in the time columns? Is there anything I can do to fix this? Thanks!
  3. (Edits: Correct charging times for 10-50 kWh for new charge curves, which previously were too optimistic. Added charging time for BTX6 100 kWh battery.) About a month ago, Tesla started rolling out updates to their fleet to allow for faster charging at the V2 Superchargers. These are the classic Superchargers which are everywhere, and they are still physically 145 kW maximum, serving a pair of stalls. The new V3 Superchargers will be able to serve 250 kW, per stall, but they are not yet available - we will report on their performance once we have data. But how does the fast V2 Supercharging actually perform in reality? Thanks to ABRP users logging in with MyTesla in ABRP, and generously sharing data with us, we are able to record charging sessions for a lot of different cars at a lot of different supercharger locations. So this is actual crowdsourced data from the real world. Increasing the charging power on vehicles should of course be a win for the drivers, leading to shorter charging times, but in particularly this case, there are some if's-and-but's: For Model S and X, this is done by just decreasing the margins; will the cars and batteries actually cope with it? The V2 Superchargers can provide 145 kW max for a pair of stalls. Normally, the first car to charge in a pair would get all power it could take, and the rest would be given to the other stall - now how would this work if the first car can actually take 145 kW? Obviously, actually getting full power would be even more dependent on Supercharger occupancy. Since the Supercharger charging cables and connectors were not build to deliver 145 kW, this will make the charging power even more dependent on external factors such as temperature. For these reasons, we have chosen to be cautious and not yet enable the faster charging curves in ABRP. We will do it as soon as we see that it works well enough in the real world. Enough talking, let's get to actual data! Model 3 Long Range, the BT37 battery (75 kWh) The plot below shows charging data gathered from Model 3s in ABRP from April 1st 2019, each sample is a faint blue dot. The red curve is the present (old) charge curve in ABRP for this battery, and as we can see it is limited to about 120 kW. In charging sessions with cars with upgraded charging power, which depends on software version, and at Superchargers which support it, we see a clear cloud of charging points up around 145 kW for 10-40% SoC. The yellow curve is the fitted charging curve to this new data. Translating these charge curves into charging times from 10 kWh to 50 kWh in the battery (in absolute energy to make it comparable between battery sizes) we get: Old 120 kW charging curve: 24 minutes 27 seconds New charging curve: 21 minutes 31 and seconds That is a pretty decent time saving! As long as there is Supercharger power available for you, of course. Clearly, the BT37 battery and Model 3 has been designed from the beginning for higher power charging. Model S/X100, the BTX6 battery (100 kWh) The BTX6 battery is the old grandmaster among Tesla batteries. Except for being the clearly highest capacity battery, it could also take 120 kW longer than any other battery. However, in the plot below, we notice something when it is pushed to 145 kW - see those decreasing lines of charging dots from 145 to 120 kW? It really seems like the charging speed tapers off pretty quickly irrespective if you start at high or low SoC. The likely cause is that something in the battery or cabling gets too hot and that the cooling system is not able to keep it cool enough. Too bad on this fine piece of battery! Translating these charge curves into charging times from 10 kWh to 50 kWh in the battery we get: Old charging curve: 22 minutes 16 seconds The conclusion from this data is that unfortunately, the Model S/X100 were never designed for higher power charging than 120 kW, and the increased peak power is mostly a gimmick for these cars. Model S/X90, BTX4 Battery (90 kWh) The first small increase in battery size from the original S85, the BTX4 90 kWh battery, has never been a real success. First of all, it's actual capacity is around 82 kWh - pretty far from 90 - and there have been signs of it degrading faster than other batteries. There has also been reports of users who have received power limitations on supercharging after a certain number of lifetime supercharges. So, our guess would have been that it would not have received any charging power upgrade at all. However, some of the data we have show that there seems to be a small push up to 125 kW for some vehicles. If this holds, the charging times for the S/X90 would actually be slightly improved. Translating these charge curves into charging times from 10 kWh to 50 kWh in the battery we get: Old charging curve: 24 minutes 52 seconds New charging curve: 23 minutes 18 seconds But again, the BTX4 is a tricky battery. Let us see what more data shows. Model S/X75, BTX5 battery (75 kWh) The 75 kWh battery has traditionally been a bit of a slow charger (in the Tesla universe), and a charging power upgrade would be a nice addition. As can be seen in the graph below, the BTX5 actually seems to really enjoy the higher power charging, which could be expected given that the peak charging power is still below the Supercharger-as-designed 120 kW and that the car probably has the same cooling capacity as the S/X100. Translating these charge curves into charging times from 10 kWh to 50 kWh in the battery we get: Old charging curve: 29 minutes 22 seconds New charging curve: 27 minutes 58 seconds This is a welcome charging time improvement for the small size Model S/X battery, especially since these cars have to charge more often. And given that the car and V2 Superchargers have been designed from 120 kW from the beginning, this is likely actually going to work well. TL;DR Tesla's increased charging power looks great for the Model 3 and the Model S/X75 since these car models were designed to take higher charging power. The increase for the Model S/X90 and 100 mostly looks like a gimmick to stay ahead on competition - something Tesla does pretty well anyway! How to contribute data? If you own a Tesla and use ABRP, please do login with MyTesla in ABRP, and check the boxes "Share data with ABRP" and even better "36h background sharing", which allows ABRP to poll your car for up to 36 hours after you have used ABRP. This helps us gather all your supercharging along a trip even if you don't use ABRP all the time. The MyTesla token which we get from Tesla after you log in is never stored permanently in our servers, only in your own browser. We definitively don't want to put your vehicle at any risk even if our servers get hacked.
  4. I may have dreamed this, but I thought I saw somewhere that once one has a trip planned in ABRP, that routing and all of its data can be sent to the on board Tesla navigation, and override the basic Tesla navigation options. I have an upcoming multi-stop/multi-SuperCharger trip coming up with some customized ABRP routings--nothing that either Google or Tesla would support. Is there anyway to upload this routing to the car and use it instead of the limited Tesla routing? If so, will the Navigate on Autopilot be able to read the ABRP routing the same as if it were the Tesla routing? Has anyone done this? How'd you do it? Thanks...

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Bo - Lead Developer and Tesla owner: bo@abetterrouteplanner.com

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