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chuq

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  1. Thanks @Bo (ABRP) - that is brilliant! The only issue I can see so far is that some of the chargers already exist (from OCM) and so naming consistency is a bit off. I'm guessing existing stations take priority? If I update columns in the spreadsheet, will it overwrite? Which columns are you using for connector info? J-M or N-Y? I provided both because I wasn't sure which was best for you, but they provide the same info in two different formats. I can remove the unused columns.
  2. Hi @Jason (ABRP) - any further updates on whether ABRP can make use of this data?
  3. Good idea - similar to my suggestion here!
  4. Thanks Jason, I've created a Google Sheet here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1A6jrzPsrrUyWzEQ4HVpoaHK85cK3un0auG1b5Gc85NA/edit?usp=sharing Note that there is a second tab "notes", which contains some general background info. Specifically I've provided the plug data in two formats: Columns J-M and N-Y. Please let me know which of these formats works best for you (or something else entirely). Also if there are any more fields that you need. I'm also sharing this spreadsheet link with a few EV community groups for their comments, as noted on the "notes" page.
  5. More information that may be helpful - see this route: https://abetterrouteplanner.com/?plan_uuid=83140118-fd1f-4a4f-924d-1820eb020e28 (Launceston, Tas, to Richmond, Vic) - basically the same as before but with another ~100 km of driving first. Note that the routing engine is happy for the route to be completed with an 85D boarding the ferry with 65% (despite this giving it less remaining range than a 75D at 100%, which fails - in both this example and the previous example). I'm not sure what this means but it might help to work out what the issue is!
  6. Update - I notice that the distance is displayed correctly now - 8 km, 436 km, 8 km (rather than 8 km, 436 km, -428 km). I'm not sure if something was updated, or if I did something different on my end. Everything else is the same though!
  7. +1 for this! There are slight differences between Australia and New Zealand, but there is enough overlap to group them: Our EV plugs are (common to Australia and NZ) J1772 (same as US - generally max 7.2 kW) Type 2 (same as Europe - generally max 22 kW) Tesla (same as Europe - generally max 22 kW) - can confirm both Australia and NZ use the European connector Our wall plugs are (with comments relating to Australia, not sure about NZ): 10A socket (max 2.4 kW) - referred to as "Type I" by Arthur - this is the common one that is in all households. 15A socket (max 3.6 kW) - described in the "Type I" link Arthur posted - not common generally, but in Australia it is the defacto caravan park standard, however I don't think this is the case in NZ. 3-phase socket (max 22 kW) - technically a "32A 3-phase socket" - not common generally, but is seen in industrial settings. However it has been used extensively in the Round Australia Electric Highway, making it very important for EVs. It exists in NZ but is almost non-existent. The fourth wall plug that should be included is the one Arthur mentions - CEE Blue - I haven't seen in Australia so I assume it's NZ only. I'll have a go at doing up some icons for these in the coming days, but here are some images: Picture of 10A vs 15A (very similar, probably can just use the same icon) Picture of 32A 3-phase:
  8. Description: If there are no suitable DC chargers on a route, permit the routing engine to use AC chargers to fill in a gap. Use Case: I live in an area with few DC chargers - I drive a 2012 Leaf and the nearest DC charger is 200 km away. AC slow charging is necessary for some of us! I've tested some routes which would be possible with an AC charge (and the charger appears on the map) but the routing engine doesn't use it, instead opting to fail to identify a route. This also applies to the Round Australia Electric Highway. This is a not a network of chargers in the traditional sense, but a collection of "dumb" 22kW three-phase power sockets which have been installed by enthusiasts around remote highways across Australia. The rationale behind them is that it will be a long time before DC fast charging comes to these remote routes and so these sockets will be the only available option for the foreseeable future. More info here: https://www.teslaowners.org.au/round-australia
  9. Thanks Jason! One of the organisations I've mentioned, Chargefox, is experienced in running EV charging stations so I expect they'll want to do something like this. I've logged a request with their support team. Of the others, the Queensland one is run by a government department and their chargers aren't managed from what I can see (they are free and not part of any charging network). They might not have the resources, or if they do, it might not be a priority for them. The NRMA network is kind of in between the two (they aren't an EV charging specific organisation, but they are taking a greater hands-on approach). Would the simple Google Sheets option be better for these locations? Any comments on "data provider to ABRP" vs "data provider to OCM to ABRP"? Obviously any site info that goes to OCM just flows on to ABRP without any effort from you, but are there any benefits to the provider interfacing direct to ABRP?
  10. Addendum to this: I’m happy to create a Google Sheet with the relevant site details if that is a quicker way of setting this up. I just need to know what fields are required and in which order. (Then later on as the relevant companies/government departments make their feeds available, a more long term synchronisation method can be set up.)
  11. chuq

    tesla v2 150kw

    *Almost* all of them can. Note that some of the older ones are still 120kW (not v1, which were 90kW - just early v2). See the comments from joel in this thread: https://forum.supercharge.info/t/supercharger-sites-data-which-need-updating-or-contain-errors/250/84
  12. Description: When a route includes a ferry connection, ABRP uses the distance of the ferry route as part of the range calculation. This can result in routes not being found for short range vehicles. Link to Plan: https://abetterrouteplanner.com/?plan_uuid=aba9bef8-b356-43f0-95e9-5147b91e5a36 Replication Steps: See the link as shown above. Note it includes an 8 km land route, a 436 km ferry route then another 8 km land route. Vehicle used is a Tesla Model S 2012-2018 85D. The route plans correctly. Change the vehicle from an 85D to a 75D. The route does not plan correctly - no routes found. This route should be able to be calculated even with (e.g.) a Nissan Leaf 24kWh. Note that vehicle SOC calculations are correct. The distance is "cancelled out" with the next step (distance is shown as "-428 km") so the total trip distance is correct.
  13. chuq

    tesla v2 150kw

    I notice that ABRP uses supercharge.info for Tesla supercharger data. 150 kW status is only really visible on the in-car nav (not on the Tesla website map, for example) so supercharge.info relies on people checking stations near them and reporting the speed rating. Many superchargers in the western half of North America have been updated but not eastern North America, or other continents. From the editor who updated these "Most of those that are still 120 kW are on the original transcontinental route through Minnesota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Colorado, and a few of the really early west coast ones which haven't been upgraded since (Folsom, etc.)" If any Tesla owners want to check their in-car navigation system and provide a list of locations which report back as 150 kW, I can get them updated.
  14. Here in Australia we have been slow on the takeup of EVs, but now there are several networks popping up. However apart from the Tesla superchargers, none of them appear in ABRP. I've added a couple of stations near me to OpenChargeMap, but I'd like to contact the networks that operate them, to ask them to make their location information available in a format that is useful to OCM and ABRP. A couple of questions: 1) What is easier for ABRP? For the data to be provided to OCM (and then ABRP gets it from there) or to be provided to ABRP directly? 2) What do I need to tell these organisations? What formats etc? (Bearing in mind I'm as much a stranger to these organisations as I am to ABRP - I can't get the data myself or help test.) The organisations (all in Australia) are: - Queensland Electric Super Highway - a government funded and operated network of 18 DC fast chargers (50 kW) in Queensland. - NRMA Electric Vehicle network - a state motoring organisation which is funding and operating over 40 DC fast chargers (50 kW) in New South Wales (12 built so far) - Chargefox - a charge network operator which, as well as already operating many AC and 50kW DC chargers, is building a network of 22 ultra-rapid (350 kW) charging sites across the country (3 built so far) - Evie Networks - a charge network operator which hasn't built anything yet, but are also planning ultra-rapid (350 kW) charging sites across the country
  15. Hello, new ABRP forum user here (but not a new ABRP user!) This is pretty awful behaviour from Plugshare. Most of their data is crowd-sourced and given to them for free. 😞

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