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Bo (ABRP)

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  1. Bo (ABRP)

    ABRP 3.5.1 Release Notes

    ABRP 3.5 - Better Driving Mode and Offline Web App Today we have released ABRP 3.5.1 with a lot of improvements, as usual. Major focus of this release is to improve the experience in driving mode and offline/limited connectivity support The mission of A Better Routeplanner is about meeting two needs Planning, preparing, estimating the time, and generally dreaming of future trips, at home or on the road in your favorite browser Driving and getting feedback on how it goes, how your compare to the plan, ensuring that you will safely make it to the next charger - or replan if needed The ABRP driving mode addresses the second point above by providing real-time status based on your position compared to the plan, with optional car real-time car status based on optional MyTesla login (for Tesla owners) or OBD data (for some EVs). Web App with Offline Support ABRP is now supporting Chrome's and Safari's ability to allow a web app to work offline (a.k.a "PWA" - progressive web app). This means that ABRP will continue to display your latest plan and map even offline and even if you do not use it for a while. In Android and Chrome, you will be asked to "Add ABRP to the home screen", which means it will appear like any app in your app drawer. The same thing can be done by adding it to your home screen in Safari. This also means that ABRP works in full screen! The offline support does not include planning new routes, though, as this requires help from our servers! Let us know if there is more offline functionality you would like to have. Map-less Mode In ABRP 3.5 we introduce map-less full screen mode for those of us who know the way anyway, or use a second navigation system such as Waze in parallel to ABRP. The map-less driving mode is also lighter on the browser, which makes it more enjoyable in e.g. the Tesla browser. You can switch back and forth between the normal map mode and map-less any time you want by clicking the map icon: You can also click the "frame" button on top of the driving display while driving: Have fun planning and driving! Give us your feedback on the ABRP forums or on Twitter @Routebetter!
  2. Bo (ABRP)

    Alpha Feedback - BMW i3

    It took far too long, but now we have the 120 Ah models in ABRP too.
  3. Bo (ABRP)

    ABRP for charging monitoring

    Yes, we could definitively do this - all technical functionality is there. I'll add it to our TODO feature list!
  4. Bo (ABRP)

    More data in overview grid

    If you click the small settings icon next to the starting point input field, you will get a window where you can enter a departure time. This will show the calendar times of arrival and departure for all stops. Does that solve your problem?
  5. Bo (ABRP)

    ABRP for charging monitoring

    Ah, I see. So basically you'd want a popup or something saying "Charging almost done?"
  6. Bo (ABRP)

    Tesla Battery Charging Data from 801 Cars

    Different batteries have different characteristics when it comes to charging; this goes for the various Tesla battery models too. Through the ABRP data collection by generous users, we have quite a lot of real-world data to base our models for use in the route planning, and in this post we give you some insight into the data. The data here is based on 4600 Supercharging sessions from 801 Tesla Vehicles! First of all, the battery model of a Tesla is not completely clear from the model name. An almost complete list of Tesla batteries includes: BT37: The 75 kWh battery in a Model 3 Long Range BT60: The old S60 60 kWh battery BT70: The old S70 70 kWh battery BT85: The classic “85” kWh battery in a Model S85 BTX4: The 90 kWh battery in S90 and X90 BTX5: The 75 kWh battery in S75 and X75 BTX6: The top-of-the-line battery 100 kWh in S100 and X100 BTX7: A rare 85 kWh battery, where we have almost no data BTX8: An 85 kWh battery found in some rare S75 and X75 Model 3 LR – BT37 First out is the Model 3 Long Range battery. There is a limited amount of data in ABRP’s database – only 38 charging sessions from 13 cars – so please contribute! The blue dots are measured data points and the red dashed line is the present ABRP charging power model. The estimated battery capacity from the contributing cars is 72.8 kWh Model S85 – BT85 Second, the classic S85 battery, which is known for not really being 85 kWh. There is plenty of data here, and as you can see it is charging at very high speed all the way from 0% SoC, but tapers off relatively early. The estimated battery capacity from the contributing cars is 73.4 kWh. That’s why I wrote “85”. It has basically the same capacity as an S/X75. Model S70 – BT70 The older S70(d) battery is similar to the BT85, but smaller. From data, the estimated usable capacity is 65.7 kWh. Model S/X90 – BTX4 The S/X90 battery, is like the “85 kWh” battery also not really living up to its name. The estimated capacity from the data is 79.8 kWh. It differs from the BT85 in that it charges slower at really low SoC (below 10%) but it compensates by charging a lot faster at higher SoC. Charging at BTX4 battery from 10 kWh to 50 kWh takes 23 minutes. The same charge (in absolute energy, not %) takes 27 minutes in a BT85. Model S/X75 – BTX5 The “new” 75 kWh battery, sometimes software limited to 60 kWh in a S/X60 has an estimated capacity of 71.6 kWh. The charging curve is similar to the BTX4 and BTX6 batteries, but in absolute power lower due to the smaller capacity. Charging from 10 kWh to 50 kWh takes 27 minutes. Model S/X100 – BTX6 The (so far) largest Tesla battery is a real beast. The charging is, in a large SoC region, limited by the 120 kW power output of most superchargers. 20 minutes to charge from 10 kWh to 50 kWh. As you can see from the data points below, owners tend not to ever go much below 10% SoC, and there is a reason – they have so much capacity. 95.7 kWh according to the ABRP data Model S/X75 Unicorn – BTX8 There are a couple of odd Model S and X 75 with an 85 kWh battery, software limited. It is rumored that they have been fitted with left over BT85 batteries, but the charging curves do not look exactly the same. Anyhow, the result is a battery pack with a lot of extra margin and really fast charging. Lucky owners – 14 of them contribute data to ABRP! TL;DR Battery Code Tesla Model Estimated Usable Capacity 10 kWh -> 50 kWh charge time BT37 3 Long Range 72.8 kWh 23 min BT60 S60 56.3 kWh 42 min BT70 S70 65.7 kWh 33 min BT85 S85 73.4 kWh 27 min BTX4 S/X90 79.8 kWh 23 min BTX5 S/X75 71.6 kWh 27 min BTX6 S/X100 95.7 kWh 20 min BTX8 Rare S/X75 25 min
  7. As you may already know, ABetterRouteplanner.com collects driving data from contributing users. This data is used to improve the ABRP car models (i.e. the mathematical representation of each type of car) and also, to give back to the ABRP community providing the data, to be published here in the blog! At this point, we have received a lot of Model 3 Long Range driving data, and even enough data from Model 3 Performance to draw some first conclusions on how they differ. We have 220 different Model 3 Long Range users who have contributed a total of 70,000 km (43,000 miles) of driving, which caters for very good data. Most of these Model 3 Long Range are the RWD version. For P3D, there is "only" 13 cars contributing so far, having driven around 7,000 km (4,300 miles) of driving, which means that statistics is a little bit more shaky, but still usable. Just to show off what those numbers mean, this is the graph of the 7,000 km of P3D data - every blue point corresponds to 30 seconds of driving at a certain speed and how much power that car has consumed during those 30 seconds. Yellow dots show the median power consumption for that speed and red line is our fitted model. Now let's boil that data down to something more understandable! First, the reference consumption, constant speed on flat land at 110 km/h (65 mph) becomes: Tesla P3D: 173 Wh/km at 110 km/h (267 Wh/km at 65 mph) Tesla Model 3 Long Range, mostly RWD: 150 Wh/km at 110 km/h (232 Wh/km at 65 mph) This means that our real-world driving data shows that the P3D consumes about 15% more than the RWD version at highway speeds. This is expected, or actually somewhat low - most P3Ds run on 20" sports wheels instead of 18" Aeros, and perhaps more importantly, P3Ds may be driven more like performance cars by their drivers. (Note that in https://abetterrouteplanner.com, we add some margin to the reference consumption to be on the safe side.) Looking at efficiency numbers for different speeds, we get the following comparison between the Tesla Model 3 Long Range, P3D and Model S100D: We can see from this graph that there is a clear difference in efficiency between the RWD and the P3D, and at higher speeds where the Aero wheels with better aerodynamics, the difference grows even more. This efficiency leads to this range-vs-speed graph: And finally, in our standard road-trip challenge of a virtual 1,000 km (621 mile) drive with fast chargers every 200 km gives us: Tesla Model 3 Long Range: Total trip time 09:44, of which charging 01:24. Tesla Model P3D: Total trip time 09:59 of which charging 01:39. Tesla Model S100D: Total trip time 10:05 of which charging 01:45. So the slightly higher consumption in a P3D does equate to 15 minutes more charging time in a 1,000 km road trip. Not too shabby! Appendix - Graphs in Imperial Units
  8. Bo (ABRP)

    Charging time

    You have a point. We measure the charge curves on reported charging power from the Tesla API, but there is likely some inefficiency between ingoing power and outgoing power. Normally, the Li-Ion batteries should be very good at charging efficiency but the cooling done by the car itself probably consumes part of that power. In the ABRP release later today, I have added an inefficiency factor to the charging time calculations internally (there is no parameter for the user to set), which I think improves the situation.
  9. Overview These instructions will walk through the steps to be performed once you have downloaded a PID list for your vehicle to your phone. You will need to reference vehicle-specific instructions at points when there are differences in setup between vehicles. At a high level, you will need to: Create an ABRP account Find a bluetooth OBD reader that works with your vehicle and pair it with your phone Set up Torque Pro or other app to log data to the ABRP Server These instructions assume you have an Android phone, as that’s what I have access to to figure out the setup. Once you’re set up and driving, the data that helps us out the most is Consistent Speed on Flat Ground, and Charging on a DC Fast Charger that’s faster than your car can charge. Of course, we’ll take any and all data you’re willing to provide, but those two sets help us the most. Step 1 – Create an ABRP Account To prevent unexpected data from being added to the server, and to allow us to delete your data upon request, you will need to create an ABRP account. This can be done on the planner, under Show Settings > Show More Settings > Login or Register Step 2 – Set Up Your OBD Reader You will need to pick an OBD Reader that works for your phone and your car. The main differences between bluetooth readers are in read speed. My first Vgate iCar was a dud, and ended up going with the OBDLink, as it’s a better overall adapter. For our purposes, we’d like at least 1 read every 10 seconds, so here are a few other adapters that should work: Name Read Rate (<15 Selected) Read Rate (>15 Selected) BAFX OBDII Reader/Scanner every 10 seconds every 30 seconds Veepak BLE1 every 5 seconds every 10 seconds Veepak Bluetooth 3 every 5 seconds every 10 seconds Vgate iCar Pro Bluetooth every 1 second every 5 seconds Vgate iCar Pro BLE every 1 second every 5 seconds OBDLink LX BLE every 1 second every 1 second Reference this table later when selecting how quickly to log to the ABRP Server in Torque. Once you have the OBD II reader, installation is pretty easy. Most cars have the OBD Port near the steering wheel, the port is a roughly trapezoidal shape: Step 3 – Configure Torque for Upload If your car has a vehicle-specific app listed, perform the instructions linked below, then you're done! Car App Nissan Leaf LeafSpy Pro (Android) (iOS) Download Torque Pro from the Play Store. You will also need a file manager if you don’t already have one. These instructions assume you’re using ES File Manager. All of the following steps are performed on your Android Phone. Download the appropriate PID file for your car and perform any additional setup steps per the links below: Show entries Search: Car Notes Chevy Bolt PID List courtesy of user Telek on the Chevy Bolt Forum Hyundai Ioniq PID List courtesy of JejuSoul on Github Hyundai Kona PID List courtesy of JejuSoul on Github Kia Niro PID List courtesy of JejuSoul on Github Showing 1 to 2 of 2 entries PreviousNext In ES File Manager, select the ☰ in the upper left, and select “Show hidden files”. Select Internal Storage at the top left (Note: The name Internal Storage may vary by device) Move the downloaded PID file(s) from /Downloads to /.torque/extendedpids If /extendedpids/ doesn’t exist yet, do the actions in step 5, then come back and move the file. If you perform step 5 here, you will need to perform it again after step 4.2 to import the file. To move the file(s): Long press the file and select “Cut” Navigate to /.torque/extendedpids Press “Paste” Open Torque Pro and import the file: Navigate to ⚙ > Settings > Manage Extra PIDs / Sensors If there are already PIDs on this page, select ⋮ and pick “Clear List” Select ⋮ and pick “Add Predefined Set” Pick the file you moved. Repeat this step for any additional files required. Configure what data to save: Navigate to ⚙ > Settings > Data Logging & Upload > Select what to log > ⋮ > Select what to log If there are already PIDs on this page, select ⋮ and pick “Clear List” Reference the “Required PIDs” table on your particular vehicle’s page. Finally, configure file save or webserver upload (Direct upload to the ABRP server is easier, you don’t have to remember to send us your data after a drive, but either method is fine. You can also do both methods simultaneously, if you want to save a local copy of your data.): If configuring Webserver Upload (Realtime web upload): Navigate to ⚙ > Settings > Data Logging & Upload Under “Realtime web upload”: ☑ Upload to webserver Web Logging Interval – Set appropriate to your adapter per the table in section 2. If in doubt, set to “every 5 seconds”. ☑ Only when OBD connected Set the Webserver URL per your vehicle specific instructions. Torque ID is not used User Email must match your ABRP login email Test Settings – Verify “No problems found!” If configuring File Save: Navigate to ⚙ > Settings > Data Logging & Upload Under “File Logging”: ☑ Synchronous Logging ☑ Log when Torque is started ☑ Only when OBD connected ☑ Automatically log GPS G Sensors are not used by ABRP ☑ Rotate Logfiles ☐ Format Log values (Do not have this option selected) Go for a drive! If using File Save: After each drive or charging session navigate to Realtime Information > ⚙ > Email Logs Select the logfile you want to send to ABRP Select “CSV (Comma Separated Values)” Send the file to jason@abetterrouteplanner.com Once you’re set up, if you’d like confirmation that your data is getting to us, you’re welcome to send me an email, and I’ll check it out for you! Also, feel free to ask for help getting set up if you run into issues.
  10. Bo (ABRP)

    Model 3 Consumption and Charging

    Finally! Enough Model 3 owners have gotten through the hassle of keeping ABRP running in a mobile browser while driving and charging to give ABRP some initial consumption and driving statistics. Have you noticed how much better ABRP has become in the mobile browser with the latest UI updates, BTW? We have data points from 57 Model 3s, but most vehicles have only provided a couple of seconds of data. Most of the data actually comes from a Swedish American cross-east-cost driver who left ABRP running often enough in the phone – great thanks Pontus! The total Model 3 distance driven with ABRP running is only so far 1200 km, consuming 187 kWh, so more data is definitively needed. However, the data we have is pretty consistent and therefore we choose to publish it here. Model 3 Power Consumption at Constant Speed Let’s dive into data. Here goes the standard power-vs-speed chart that we rely on a lot at ABRP. This is data corresponding to driving at a constant speed on flat land. Elevation and speed changes are then added on top by ABRP when planning routes. The blue dots are consumption samples (30 seconds of driving), adjusted for elevation and speed changes, and the yellow dots are median points within a 1 m/s bin. This means that the red line consumption model is fitted to the median consumption which means that most weather issues, car defects, aggressive driving and so on is typically ignored. As can be seen, we mostly have data points from very low speed and from highway speeds, but that is where things are most interesting. The bottom line; ABRP reference consumption is impressively low at these summer temperatures: 143 Wh/km at 110 km/h or 218 Wh/mile at 65 mph That is very very good and a lot of credit has to be given to Tesla for working so hard on efficiency even at high highway speeds. Model 3 Charging Power While consumption while driving is very important for a good long trip experience with an EV, this is equally true for charging. Tesla’s supercharger network is fantastic, and one of the most important factors in making a Tesla the only vehicle you need. The Tesla supercharger can currently deliver up to 120 kW to one vehicle, but that is not the only limitation – the battery itself limits the power depending on its current State-of-Charge (SoC), i.e. battery %. ABRP has received charging data from 40 Model 3s at 185 charging sessions charging in total 1775 kWh (obviously it is more appealing to play with ABRP while charging the Model 3 than while driving, due to the lack of a browser in the car). The charging power curve of the Model 3 battery “BT37” is quite impressive: It basically takes as much power as the S/X 100D BTX6 battery at the same SoC %, but with a smaller battery capacity. The estimated usable capacity of the BT37 battery from this data is 73.4 kWh. Comparing Tesla Model S3X at Summer Temperatures In an attempt to compare the characteristics of all of Tesla’s present models we have plotted the consumption and range of a Model S100D, Model 3 Long Range and Model X100D based on ABRPs models – in turn based on all generously donated data. The data speaks for itself; X is obviously the most power hungry vehicle of the three, and the consumption model indicates that its is particularly bad at high speeds – but that is hardly a surprise given the sheer size of the X. Model 3 is indeed impressively effective. Even more impressive is that while Model S100D keeps the lead in the range league, Model 3 Long Range is not far behind even though it only has 75% of the battery size of the 100D: One more thing. The combination of low power consumption and high charging speed gives the Model 3 Long Range a unique position in the perhaps most interesting challenge: Shortest road trip time. Take a fictitious road trip with 200 km (124 miles) between Superchargers. Drive at a constant highway speed, 120 km/h (75 mph) between chargers for a total of 1000 km (620 miles). The result according to ABRP looks like this: Model 3 Long Range: Total trip duration 09:43, of which charging 01:23 Model S100D: Total trip duration 10:05, of which charging 01:45 Model X100D: Total trip duration 10:29, of which charging 02:09 So the overall winner in that road trip race is clearly Model 3 Long Range. Appendix – Graphs with Imperial Units
  11. Bo (ABRP)

    Navigation error

    Thank you very much for reporting this, and so sorry for the slow response! It is now fixed by adjusting the coordinates of those chargers.
  12. Bo (ABRP)

    Hyundai Ioniq EV

    Thanks to the 4 Ioniq EV drivers contributing driving data to ABRP, we’ve finally got enough data points to define our first real world consumption curve for the Ioniq EV! We can still use driving data to improve the model even further, so if you’d like to contribute your data, have a look at the instructions. Also, if you’ve got an electric car you’d like us to support have a look at our post detailing How to Add Your Car to ABRP. Much of the data comes from day-to-day driving, with a few road trips sprinkled. Thanks to everyone who contributed their driving data! Ioniq EV Power at Constant Speed The ABRP Model, as you know, is driven by calculating the power consumed for each leg of the trip by plugging in the speed, elevation, and other factors for each segment of the trip, determining how much power the car must output to drive that segment. It then adds up all the segments, and subtracts it from the battery to determine when a charging stop is needed. For this purpose, we need an accurate driving model on flat ground as a baseline, that turns speeds into power. Then we can add all the other driving factors on top of that: The blue dots are consumption samples (30 seconds of driving), adjusted for elevation and speed changes, and the yellow dots are median points within a 1 m/s bin. This means that the red line consumption model is fitted to the median consumption which means that most weather issues, car defects, aggressive driving and so on is typically ignored. As can be seen, we mostly have data points from very low speed and from highway speeds, but that is where things are most interesting. For the Ioniq EV, Hyundai has done a decent job with their aerodynamics, but the big gains come from its small cross-sectional area and low weight. Giving it a reference consumption of only: 7.63 km/kWh (131 Wh/km) at 110 km/h or 4.95 mi/kWh (202 Wh/mile) at 65 mph That’s even lower than the Model 3 (143 Wh/km), which is extremely efficient! The Model 3 has a similar Coefficient of Drag (Cd TM3 = 0.23, Cd Ioniq = 0.24), but a higher cross-sectional area, which increases the overall drag on the car. Weight has less of an impact on range, mainly at lower speeds. At higher speeds, drag is king. We’ve now updated the live model for the Ioniq and removed the “Beta” tag, so you should see the benefits of this higher efficiency in your route planning! Do note that we still set the default a little lower than this measured value, just to ensure we give you a plan that’s not going to over-promise your car’s capabilities. If you know how well your car drives, feel free to re-adjust back to this value! Comparing to the Analytical Model Ioniq Analytical vs Actual driving range. Up to this point, we’ve been using an analytical model, and similar to the Bolt analysis, we see a pretty close fit between the two. Accounting for our standard 10% margin, it’s a pretty solid model! Road Tripping in the Ioniq Given how efficient the Ioniq is, and how quickly it can charge, it might do quite well on a road trip, even given its low range. You’d have to stop regularly to charge, but it might not require as long of a stop. The problem is, that the Ioniq cannot make our standard road trip model. (1000km at 120km/h with 200km legs). Its range is too short. However, shortening the leg distance gives it: Model 3 Long Range: Total trip duration 09:43, of which charging 01:23 Model S100D: Total trip duration 10:05, of which charging 01:45 Model X100D: Total trip duration 10:29, of which charging 02:09 Model S60: Total trip duration 10:35, of which charging 02:15 Ioniq EV: Total trip duration 10:40, of which charging 02:20 (115km legs) Model X60: Total trip duration 11:28, of which charging 03:08 Bolt EV: Total trip duration 12:20, of which charging 04:00 With this adjustment, the road trip requires 8 charging stops, and you’re stopping almost every hour. Given the number of stops, adding “fiddling with the charger” time to that will make your road trip longer, so 10:40 might be an overly optimistic number. Finally, comparing on the charging speed, we get: Ioniq Charge Speed Comparison (metric) Looking at the charge speeds this way, we see an interesting side effect of the small-but-efficient path, as well as an up-side of the more “hockey-stick” shaped charge curves a lot of manufacturers are using in upcoming vehicles. Because the Ioniq is so efficient, it gets a very high relative charge speed, even though it’s actually charging only slightly faster than the Bolt measured by kW. The hockey stick really shows itself when comparing against the S60. Even though it starts out slower, around 50% the Ioniq starts charging faster, and maintains longer than the S60. This is important for the Ioniq’s small battery, and contributes to its decent road tripping time. Appendix: Graphs in Imperial Units
  13. Bo (ABRP)

    Alpha Feedback - Renault Zoe

    To verify and improve our models we need your feedback. There's many ways we could use help if you actually own one: Drive a plan and compare it to the actual battery used. Drive a plan with the browser active, and update your actual battery percentage in the browser. Contribute data via OBD or other methods. The best way to improve the data is to provide data directly from the car. Connecting your car not only improves the models, but allows you to follow up directly in the car while driving! We have several ways of doing that, but we need your help to figure out what will work with your car: An OBD reader can be used in concert with a custom app like LeafSpy, or a PID list and Torque Pro. If your manufacturer has an API to access data from the car we can set up access to that API, like we do for Tesla If you're familiar with either of these, contact me at jason@abetterrouteplanner.com and I'll help figure out what we need to do to connect your car! Thanks for providing feedback!
  14. Bo (ABRP)

    "Time to open charge port" in route plan

    I agree to certain extent, it is kind of part of charging. At the same time, we don't want to bolster the charging times to make it look like EVs charger slower than they actually do (to avoid putting EV beginners off). So for now, it will remain part of driving time.
  15. Bo (ABRP)

    Adding Tesla account credentials

    We know that the Tesla credentials are very important to keep to yourself, and we have designed ABRP to keep things as private as possible. We never store your MyTesla password, only the token generated by Tesla. This is stored in browser local storage (like cookies), and not on our servers. If you tick "36h background sharing" we will remember your token in server memory (never on disk) for 36h to track your car and share statistics with ABRP. Hope that helps!
  16. New feature! ABRP now keeps track of charging networks/operators and allows you to prefer one or more of them. This is done by clicking a charger which has an operator and selecting "Prefer...". The planner will treat preferred chargers as "less costly" than other chargers will therefore more often use them. It is still a soft decision though, so if a non-preferred charger gives a significantly faster plan, it will still be selected. Let us know hownit works!
  17. Bo (ABRP)

    Bolt EV Consumption and Modelling

    Thanks to the 5 Bolt EV drivers contributing driving data to ABRP, we’ve finally got enough data points to define our first real world consumption curve for the Chevy Bolt EV! We can still use driving data to improve the model even further, so if you’d like to contribute your data, have a look at the instructions. Also, if you’ve got an electric car you’d like us to support, contact myself and Bo, and we’ll run you through what we need to add the car to the planner. Much of the data comes from day-to-day driving, with a few road trips sprinkled. Thanks to everyone who contributed their driving data! Bolt EV Power at Constant Speed The ABRP Model, as you know, is driven by calculating the power consumed for each leg of the trip by plugging in the speed, elevation, and other factors for each segment of the trip, determining how much power the car must output to drive that segment. It then adds up all the segments, and subtracts it from the battery to determine when a charging stop is needed. For this purpose, we need an accurate driving model on flat ground as a baseline, that turns speeds into power. Then we can add all the other driving factors on top of that: Bolt driving data fit to a third order polynomial The blue dots are consumption samples (30 seconds of driving), adjusted for elevation and speed changes, and the yellow dots are median points within a 1 m/s bin. This means that the red line consumption model is fitted to the median consumption which means that most weather issues, car defects, aggressive driving and so on is typically ignored. As can be seen, we mostly have data points from very low speed and from highway speeds, but that is where things are most interesting. For the Bolt EV, the bottom line is, it’s actually a quite efficient vehicle, though its somewhat unaerodynamic shape really hits it at high speeds. The model gives us a reference efficiency of: 6.06 km/kWh (165 Wh/km) at 110 km/h or 3.92 mi/kWh (255 Wh/mile) at 65 mph That’s pretty good for a boxy little hatchback! For comparison, that’s about halfway between the Model 3 (143 Wh/km) and the Model S (188 Wh/km). We’ve now updated the live model for the Chevy Bolt (and Ampera-E), so you should see the benefits of this higher efficiency in your route planning! Do note that we still set the default a little lower than that, just to ensure we give you a plan that’s not going to over-promise your car’s capabilities. Comparing to the Analytical Model Driving range vs speed comparison between the real world driving data and the original analytical model. Up to this point, we’ve been using an analytical model, using the drag characteristics, rolling resistance, and other parameters to determine an approximate driving model for the Bolt. Since we’ll be building a lot of these as more EVs come to market, we wondered how accurate the analytical model really is: As you can see, the models match quite closely! In fact, when building the Bolt analytical model, I added a 10% margin of safety to the model until we could validate using real world data, and you can see that at freeway speeds, the Analytical Bolt is about 10% lower than the Real World Bolt. Road Tripping in the Bolt With all the data we’ve got, let’s add the Bolt into the road table, and see where it falls: Model 3 Long Range: Total trip duration 09:43, of which charging 01:23 Model S100D: Total trip duration 10:05, of which charging 01:45 Model X100D: Total trip duration 10:29, of which charging 02:09 Model S60: Total trip duration 10:35, of which charging 02:15 Model X60: Total trip duration 11:28, of which charging 03:08 Bolt EV: Total trip duration 12:20, of which charging 04:00 This is using the “ABRP hypothetical road trip” is 1000 km (621 mi) in 200 km (124 mi) steps at 120km/h (75mph). The Bolt’s overall road trip speed is pretty slow. Even slower than the slowest Tesla. This is a consequence of the relatively slow charging that Chevy has built into the Bolt: Charge speed comparison, accounting for vehicle efficiency and battery size. Comparing the Bolt’s charge speed to that of the Model 3, we can see why our road trip takes so long! Accounting for battery size and driving efficiency differences, the Model 3 can charge nearly 2.5 times faster than the Bolt at each relative peak. All in all, the Bolt definitely can do those road trips, but it’s going to be at a much slower overall pace than the Model 3. The upcoming Hyundai Kona is a little bit faster than the Bolt, but not hugely, since it’s slightly less efficient. The larger battery makes for slightly longer range, but also means it takes a little longer to charge. Once we start getting some data, we’ll do a comparison to see how much faster the Kona really is than the Bolt. Appendix: Graphs in Imperial Units
  18. Bo (ABRP)

    Temperature and road conditions not saved

    Sorry about the slow response, but yes indeed, there was a bug preventing those from being loaded. Now it should work as intended!
  19. Bo (ABRP)

    Plan error since 23 or 24 dec

    That was easy, a division by zero caused by a charger which was marked as having maximum current of 0 amps. Now that should not be a problem again.
  20. Bo (ABRP)

    Plan error since 23 or 24 dec

    Hello Barry, I'm sure there is a bug hidden somewhere. There are no limitations on numbet of chargers whatsoever. If you can give the exact settings causing the problem I will have a look and fix it. Edit: Just realized I didn't look closely enough at your first post. I will try to replicate it from there.
  21. Bo (ABRP)

    Preferred charging networks/operators

    Thanks! I think I found it now looking into your settings. The settings are always stored in the browser local storage (like cookies, but not cookies). If you are logged in with an ABRP account they are additionally stored with your account on our server.
  22. Bo (ABRP)

    Preferred charging networks/operators

    Are you logged in to ABRP (with an ABRP account)? If so, PM me the email you use for login and I can have look what goes wrong!
  23. Bo (ABRP)

    Preferred charging networks/operators

    Yes, they are stored, but only after you plan a route using those settings (settings are saved once you press "Plan"). Let us know if it still does not work!
  24. Bo (ABRP)

    Tesla Model X Consumption vs Speed

    Similar to the post about Model S Consumption vs Speed, there is a lot of data from Model X owners driving around with ABRP active in their browsers and logged in with MyTesla. This is data from 1.2 million driving points from 279 Model X vehicles covering 160 000 km (100 000 miles), and almost all data points are included and corrected for elevation changes: The blue points are individual power consumption samples. The yellow points are the median power consumption for each speed (to remove outliers) and the red line is a fitted fourth-order polynomial model of power-vs-speed. At 30 m/s (approx. 110 km/h or 65 mph), the median consumed power for a Model X is about 25 kW. The ABRP reference consumption from this data becomes: Metric: 237 Wh/km at 110 km/h Imperial: 367 Wh/mile at 65 mph which is lower than the default settings in ABRP. Not that this is a complete mix of all factors such as different vehicles, wheels, temperatures, weather and so on. For fun, we can compare Model S and Model X curves: Model X consumption We can see that at low speeds, for example 10 m/s (36 km/h or 22 mph) the power consumption for both vehicles is pretty similar at about 7-8 kW. At high speeds, though, the much worse aerodynamic drag of the Model X comes in to play with full force. At 40 m/s (145 km/h or 90 mph), the Model S consumes 36 kW (250 Wh/km or 402 Wh/mile) whereas Model X needs 45 kW (312 Wh/km or 503 Wh/mile) to maintain speed. Note that you can easily convert from instantaneous power (in W) to energy-per-distance using the formula Energy-per-distance [Wh/distance] = Power [W] / speed [distance/h] Like this kind of data? Contribute data from your car too by logging in to MyTesla in ABRP and allowing data to be shared.
  25. Bo (ABRP)

    Route planning spoiled up since 3.4

    This is probably only a display bug of the charger. I get exactly what you have on the screenshot, but with a CCS icon instead of Type 2 at Osterfeld.

Contact Us

Bo - Lead Developer and Tesla owner: bo@abetterrouteplanner.com

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